Supernova 1998bu in the nearby spiral galaxy

Supernovae Are the Clues to the Accelerating Universe-The Journal Science Picks Top Advance for 1998: Supernova 1998bu in the near-by spiral galaxy, M96 illustrates the appearance of supernovae observed at the far greater distances necessary to see the effect of Einstein's cosmic repulsion.

The supernovae and their parent galaxies used to measure Einstein's cosmic repulsion are at distances averaging 10 billion light years-some 300 times further away than M96-and are much fainter and more difficult to discover and study. Galaxies at these distances are faint smudges of light little bigger than the stars in the field of M96 and their supernovae appear as points of light about as bright as the parent galaxy.

Dr. Nicholas Suntzeff took this true color image of supernova 1998bu near maximum brightness with the 0.9-m telescope at the National Science Foundation's Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory.

Credit:

NOIRLab

About the Image

Id:noao9810a
Type:Collage
Release date:Dec. 17, 1998
Related releases:noao9810
Size:1800 x 1653 px

About the Object

Name:SN 1998bu
Category:Stars

Image Formats

Large JPEG
202.9 KB
Screensize JPEG
55.4 KB

Zoomable


Wallpapers

1024x768
71.0 KB
1280x1024
109.1 KB
1600x1200
160.1 KB
1920x1200
194.1 KB
2048x1536
234.7 KB

Colors & filters

BandTele-scope
OpticalSMARTS 0.9-meter Telescope