M88

M88 displays a set of tight spiral arms and dust lanes in each. A recent supernova (1991) in M88 helped better determine its distance from us. Stars exploding in other galaxies can be used as a "standard candle" since astronomers know their intrinsic brightness (how bright it would appear at a known distance). Then, by measuring the brightness of the supernova, they can estimate its distance by using the properties of light (things appear dimmer the further away they are). M88 is calculated to be 60 million light years away by this method.

This image was taken as part of Advanced Observing Program (AOP) program at Kitt Peak Visitor Center during 2014.

Credit:

KPNO/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/Jim Quinn/Adam Block

About the Image

Id:noao-m88quinn
Type:Observation
Release date:Feb. 20, 2014, 1:48 p.m.
Size:2184 x 1472 px

About the Object

Name:M88
Constellation:Coma Berenices

Image Formats

Large JPEG
428.6 KB
Screensize JPEG
96.9 KB

Zoomable


Wallpapers

1024x768
124.0 KB
1280x1024
202.7 KB
1600x1200
286.8 KB
1920x1200
338.0 KB
2048x1536
417.2 KB

Coordinates

Position (RA):12 32 1.37
Position (Dec):14° 23' 25.58"
Field of view:12.42 x 8.32 arcminutes
Orientation:North is 179.2° right of vertical


Colors & filters

BandWave-lengthTele-scope
Optical
B
438 nmVisitor Center 0.5-meter Telescope
Other CCD
Optical
G
475 nmVisitor Center 0.5-meter Telescope
Other CCD
Optical
R
625 nmVisitor Center 0.5-meter Telescope
Other CCD
Optical
Broad Band
555 nmVisitor Center 0.5-meter Telescope
Other CCD