Carina Nebula Western Wall (labeled)

A 50-trillion-km (33-trillion-mile, or 5 light-year) long section of the western wall in the Carina Nebula, as observed with adaptive optics on the Gemini South telescope. This mountainous section of the nebula reveals a number of unusual structures including a long series of parallel ridges that could be produced by a magnetic field, a remarkable almost perfectly smooth wave, and fragments that appear to be in the process of being sheared off the cloud by a strong wind. There is also evidence for a jet of material ejected from a newly-formed star. The exquisite detail seen in the image is in part due to a technology known as adaptive optics, which resulted in a ten-fold improvement in the resolution of the research team’s observations.

Credit:

International Gemini Observatory/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA

Acknowledgment:
PI: Patrick Hartigan (Rice University)
Image processing: Patrick Hartigan (Rice University), Travis Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage), Mahdi Zamani & Davide de Martin

About the Image

Id:noirlab2025c
Type:Collage
Release date:Oct. 5, 2020, 6 a.m.
Related releases:noirlab2025
Size:3814 x 2039 px

About the Object

Name:Carina Nebula
Category:Nebulae

Image Formats

Large JPEG
1.9 MB
Screensize JPEG
182.5 KB

Zoomable


Wallpapers

1024x768
273.0 KB
1280x1024
419.2 KB
1600x1200
583.6 KB
1920x1200
699.3 KB
2048x1536
885.4 KB

Colors & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Infrared
H I Brγ
2.166 μmGemini South
GSAOI
Infrared
H2(1-0) S(1)
2.248 μmGemini South
GSAOI