A Vista of NGC 2626 with the SMARTS 0.9-meter Telescope

This image is so beautiful that it could almost be a painting, but it is real. It has been produced using observations made at the SMARTS 0.9-meter Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), which is a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab. It features a reflection nebula known as NGC 2626, which lies 3300 light-years from Earth. 

Reflection nebulae are not luminous themselves, but they reflect light from a nearby star or stars. The light scatters off the dust particles in the nebulae, which often results in reflection nebulae having a blue tint, because blue light scatters more efficiently. This is the same phenomenon that makes the sky on Earth appear blue — the laws of physics are the same throughout our Universe! The red nebulosities are glowing hydrogen gas.

Credit:

CTIO/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/SMARTS Consortium
Image processing: T. A. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage/NSF’s NOIRLab), M. Zamani & D. de Martin (NSF’s NOIRLab)

About the Image

Id:iotw2115a
Type:Observation
Release date:April 14, 2021, 4 p.m.
Size:1819 x 2022 px

About the Object

Name:NGC 2626
Constellation:Vela
Category:Nebulae

Image Formats

Large JPEG
1.1 MB
Screensize JPEG
330.7 KB

Zoomable


Wallpapers

1024x768
258.1 KB
1280x1024
412.2 KB
1600x1200
601.7 KB
1920x1200
634.6 KB
2048x1536
854.0 KB

Coordinates

Position (RA):8 35 37.96
Position (Dec):-40° 39' 47.25"
Field of view:12.17 x 13.53 arcminutes
Orientation:North is 0.1° right of vertical


Colors & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
g
475 nmSMARTS 0.9-meter Telescope
CCD
Optical
r
626 nmSMARTS 0.9-meter Telescope
CCD
Optical
i
773 nmSMARTS 0.9-meter Telescope
CCD
Optical
H-alpha
655 nmSMARTS 0.9-meter Telescope
CCD