Illustration of a Short Gamma-Ray Burst Caused by a Collapsing Star

This illustration depicts a collapsing star that is producing two short gamma-ray jets. Just before a massive, collapsing star explodes as a supernova, we often observe a gamma-ray burst (a brief explosion of gamma-ray radiation) if the jets are pointed toward Earth. Most known supernova-produced gamma-ray bursts are “long” (lasting more than two seconds), but one called GRB 200826 was “short” (lasting just 0.6 second). Astronomers think this, and possibly other short supernova-produced gamma-ray bursts, appeared short because the jets of gamma rays aren’t strong enough to completely escape the star. This would produce jets that are shorter in both length and duration.

Credit:

International Gemini Observatory/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/J. da Silva 

Image processing: M. Zamani (NSF's NOIRLab)

About the Image

Id:noirlab2121a
Type:Artwork
Release date:July 26, 2021, 8 a.m.
Related releases:noirlab2121
Size:5120 x 2880 px

About the Object


Image Formats

Large JPEG
3.1 MB
Screensize JPEG
125.1 KB

Zoomable


Wallpapers

1024x768
174.3 KB
1280x1024
267.2 KB
1600x1200
376.0 KB
1920x1200
439.9 KB
2048x1536
611.7 KB