Whole disk NIRI image sharp

This image showing the entire disk of Jupiter in infrared light was compiled from a mosaic of nine separate pointings observed by the international Gemini Observatory, a program of NSF’s NOIRLab on 29 May 2019. From a “lucky imaging” set of 38 exposures taken at each pointing, the research team selected the sharpest 10%, combining them to image one ninth of Jupiter’s disk. Stacks of exposures at the nine pointings were then combined to make one clear, global view of the planet. Even though it only takes a few seconds for Gemini to create each image in a lucky imaging set, completing all 38 exposures in a set can take minutes — long enough for features to rotate noticeably across the disk. In order to compare and combine the images, they are first mapped to their actual latitude and longitude on Jupiter, using the limb, or edge of the disk, as a reference. Once the mosaics are compiled into a full disk, the final images are some of the highest-resolution infrared views of Jupiter ever taken from the ground.

Credit:

International Gemini Observatory/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA, M.H. Wong (UC Berkeley) and team

Acknowledgments: Mahdi Zamani

About the Image

Id:noirlab2011a
Type:Planetary
Release date:May 7, 2020, 3 a.m.
Related releases:noirlab2011
Size:1400 x 1300 px

About the Object

Name:Jupiter
Category:Solar System

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Colors & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Infrared
M'
4.68 μmGemini North
NIRI